#worklifebalance in higher ed

robinson884 005

robinson884 005

Week two of my Social Media Ethos Project. Some interesting results so far, even in just how I am thinking about my Twitter feed. For example, when I have hopped on the past few days, I do so with much more purpose. I no longer scroll endlessly, slack-jawed and glazing over. I am looking for particularly relevant content. I am looking for something. This has helped me: a) not feel so overwhelmed by the sheer volume of content I’m scrolling through, and b) has made it easier to dis-engage after a discrete period of time.

Also, knowing that I won’t as easily be “sucked in” to an overwhelming and purpose-less scroll-through has helped me engage more. I used to just avoid the platform altogether.

This week, I posted a bit more boldly on the theme of work-life balance. I am employing the hashtags…

#worklifebalance, usually paired with:

#highered

and most recently,

#higheredworklifebalance

That last one feels a bit unwieldy. But I have to say that due to my increased activity, I’ve seen an increase in reactions to tweets and even gained some followers (6 total).

Specifically, in response to my re-tweeting of her article on why she left academia to start a consulting business, Katie Taylor tweeted at me:

screen-shot-2017-01-27-at-2-54-30-pm

I, of course, liked this tweet and immediately “replied.” The problem with that last step is that I am having trouble finding the reply, or confirming that I actually did hit “send.” I want to respond to her to continue this conversation (my original reply had to do with my thoughts about “balance” as more “homeostasis” than a static state…), however, I’m running into a social-norm-constraint of the genre and platform. If I did manage to reply before, I don’t want to repeat myself. If I didn’t…there is no way to know…

However, I find it interesting that Katie is able to tweet about the fact that there is no panacea. Flexibility indeed doesn’t always equal balance, it just might make it more self-directed than outside-directed (which can be harder for some).

I also noticed 3 likes and 4 re-tweets of an article and accompanying tweet I composed on the 24th:

screen-shot-2017-01-27-at-2-55-26-pm

I am interested into why this tweet, more than the others with similar hashtags, was picked up. It may be the fact that the original article was posted by NCTE (National Council of Teachers of English), and since that is a large professional organization, it would have a) more credibility and b) a wider following than an individual like myself.

Overall, my experience with this project has been fascinating. I’m looking forward to continuing my journey and learning more about Twitter and my own ethos as it develops on this social media platform.

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